“Offended by Fiesta, activists plan protest”

The Santa Fe New Mexican ran this piece by Daniel Chacon. The headline is bullshit, because this has nothing to do with “taking offence” and everything to do with standing up against a racist, historically inaccurate narrative.

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Santa Fe Fiestas Protest Revisited

The action we did at the 2015 Fiesta de Santa Fe was intended to respectfully raise awareness around the false narrative that the Fiesta Council continues to share every year. They believe including a few Native peoples is adequate, but we believe the entire story needs to be adjusted to reflect more of what truly happened and the long-standing impact the conquest has had on the people in this state.

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Gatherings to Condemn the Murder of Alton Sterling

 

Thursday, July 7 at 7pm at the UNM Bookstore in Albuquerque

Protest/rally/vigil honoring Alton Sterling (RIP) and condemning police brutality and the murder of countless Black men, women, children, and other minorities….

AND… Thursday, July 7 at 7pm at the Plaza in Santa Fe

Share in a moment of silence for the murder of Alton Sterling. Show solidarity for all people of color who have lost their lives to police violence.

It’s past time we talked about gentrification

Since the word “gentrification” is on the lips of many New Mexicans now (due to the Albuquerque Rapid Transit project displacing some, negatively impacting many businesses, and possibly using funds designated for low-income communities, and Meow Wolf opening in Santa Fe), it’s time to talk about what the long-term effects of gentrification are and how to prevent the negative impacts.

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Japanese Internment Camps in New Mexico

February 19, 2016 marked the 74th anniversary of the beginning of the Japanese internment camps. Shortly following the attacks on Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered the incarceration and forced relocation of 110,000 to 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry who lived on the Pacific coast. Sixty-two percent of the internees were US citizens. Incarcerated without trial, they were forced to leave behind their families along with everything they knew and loved. The internment has been determined to have resulted more from racism in the West Coast rather than any military danger posed by Japanese Americans.

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