Santa Fe Fiestas Protest Revisited

The action we did at the 2015 Fiesta de Santa Fe was intended to respectfully raise awareness around the false narrative that the Fiesta Council continues to share every year. They believe including a few Native peoples is adequate, but we believe the entire story needs to be adjusted to reflect more of what truly happened and the long-standing impact the conquest has had on the people in this state.

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The Girls Of The Leesburg Stockade

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In 1963, about 20 girls were jailed for 45 days in a one-room jail in Leesburg, Ga. for their participation in Civil Rights marches in Americus. They didn’t talk about that experience for 50 years. Now the nine surviving members of The 1963 Leesburg Stockade Girls have been nominated for the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Learn more about their story here.

Hear their personal testimony in a 7-minute video here.

 

Gatherings to Condemn the Murder of Alton Sterling

 

Thursday, July 7 at 7pm at the UNM Bookstore in Albuquerque

Protest/rally/vigil honoring Alton Sterling (RIP) and condemning police brutality and the murder of countless Black men, women, children, and other minorities….

AND… Thursday, July 7 at 7pm at the Plaza in Santa Fe

Share in a moment of silence for the murder of Alton Sterling. Show solidarity for all people of color who have lost their lives to police violence.

Curriculum for White Americans to Educate Themselves on Race and Racism

This extensive post by Jon Greenberg has many links to resources on how to be a strong white ally to people of color. “By ‘curriculum,’ I do not mean a unit of study for classroom use (to be clear: this list is separate from my work in the classroom); rather, these resources, inspired by the #Charlestonsyllabus, are for anybody who wants to learn more from perspectives often underrepresented among many White circles.”

Links to these resources will be added to the United Against Racism – NM Resources page.

ByBarryDeutsch

By Barry Deutsch

There are no doubt complexities that come with White Americans working for racial justice. White privilege can lead to a chronic case of undiagnosed entitlement, creating poor listeners, impatient speakers who talk over others, and people unaccustomed to taking orders. Nevertheless, the movement for racial justice needs more White Americans to get involved. And it’s our responsibility to help each other get involved–and get involved productively. I compiled this list to help White Americans do so.