The first steps in not being racist

Interesting article on Quartz:

“White fragility” refers to white people’s low emotional tolerance for discussing topics of race and racism.

The term was coined by Dr. Robin DiAngelo in a 2011 article discussing her experience with white people in anti-racism trainings. She defines it as “a state when even a minimum amount of racial stress becomes intolerable, triggering a range of defensive moves.”

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Driving While Black

A friend shared a recent Vice article/videoDriving While Black, which talks about a new report from Seton Hall Law School Center for Policy & Research which found that in the majority-white municipality of Bloomfield, NJ, nearly 80% of traffic tickets are issued to African American and Latino drivers. The report also found that most tickets were issued to non-resident minority drivers passing through town, suggesting a “de facto border patrol” policing policy is in effect.

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It’s past time we talked about gentrification

Since the word “gentrification” is on the lips of many New Mexicans now (due to the Albuquerque Rapid Transit project displacing some, negatively impacting many businesses, and possibly using funds designated for low-income communities, and Meow Wolf opening in Santa Fe), it’s time to talk about what the long-term effects of gentrification are and how to prevent the negative impacts.

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“Grieving the White Void”

Abe Lateiner wrote a piece shared on Medium.com, “Grieving the White Void.” 

He talks about his experience with race and privilege throughout his life, how White supremacy negatively impacts ALL people, how he came to see his personal stake in ending White supremacy as a White person (and it’s not White guilt…White guilt is a step in the process, but it’s not the end-game), and how we must learn to grieve what has happened and live with integrity. He gives examples of what we can all do to end White supremacy.

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“Blood and Betrayal in the Southwest”

From NPR’s Latino USA: “The Southwest was once a part of Mexico, but that doesn’t mean that Mexicans have always felt welcome there. Land disputes led to segregation, discrimination and even state-sanctioned violence. Latino USA looks into the history of resistance leaders like Juan Cortina and Reies López Tijerina, the dark side of the Texas Rangers and school segregation in an episode dedicated to the often untold history of blood and betrayal in the Southwest.”

The featured image on the Soundcloud link is Texas Rangers mounted on horses in 1915. (PHOTO by Robert Ruynon from the Robert Runyon Photograph Collection, courtesy of the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History)